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Best Books: The 2014 Edition

Through various platforms I have always rounded up my favourite books of 20## because I read a lot and let's face it, there are some beauties in there. In 2013 I did a '13 things for 2013' and I may do something similar when my brain is more awake. For now, have some book recommendations:

1. 1984 by George Orwell -- having wanted to read this for years after my Grandpa gingerly placed a beautiful copy of Animal Farm into my small, naive hands, I am so happy finally to have got around to reading it. I think most people know of this book and all I will really say is this: r e a d  i t.

2. More Than This by Patrick Ness -- a dystopian theme is arising here. I read Ness' beautiful A Monster Calls a couple of years ago and it was nice to finally sit down and read this beautiful novel. Profoundly thought-provoking and such a page turner. It's been a long time since I've read any YA that I've loved this much.

3. Tigers in Red Weather by Liza Klaussmann -- Just b e a utiful. This book is like tasting summer from the first page and though it took me absolutely ages to get through (due to university) I loved every moment. I really hope Klaussmann writes more!

4. Station Eleven by Emily Mandel St John -- A recent read given to me by one of my Waterstones colleagues and he was not wrong in his judgement. This book is not only beautifully written, it's so so well thought out. One of the reasons I love it so much is that it thinks so complexly about human life, about people. I adored it.

5. The Guest Cat by Takashi Hiraide -- Another Waterstone-related read, The Guest Cat takes you into this story for a short while but it does so in a way that you can't help but keep on reading. Hiraide is a Japanese poet and that much is clear through is writing style. This little book has kept coming back to me since I read it - a real treat!

6. Trainspotting by Irvine Welsh -- I'd never read anything like Welsh's famous novel and though it took me a long, long time (and a lot of lucazade) to get through it, I really did enjoy it. I still vividly remember buying supplies for the night and staying awake until 4:30am to finish it (it honestly felt like such an achievement). I definitely want to read more of Welsh's novels in the future.

7. The Humans by Matt Haig -- Haig has followed me on twitter for a while now and when they had some copies of his books signed in the bookshop I swooped on them. I knew before I opened this book that I was going to adore it, and that was exactly the case. It was glued to my hand for the whole evening and it took me approximately a day to read.

8. Nomad by RJ Anderson -- Rebecca is one of my all-time (if not my all-time) favourite author. She has been enchanting us with her fantasy series since 2009 (ish) and I am still hooked. Though her books keep jumping between 9-12 and Teen fiction, if you love fantasy/faerie stories then please please please go and pick a copy of Knife up. You won't be sorry!

9. This Star Won't Go Out by Esther Earl -- This book gave me a kick up the backside that I really needed. I cried. I laughed. It held out a hand to me that I really desperately needed at the time. Thank you and rest in awesome Esther.

10. Landline by Rainbow Rowell -- Again, much like Haig's book I expected to love Landline and once again I was right. I hesitantly put it down for lectures and work but I thoroughly immersed myself when I did read it. It was also the book I used in my Waterstones job interview!

11. The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood -- One of my course friends insisted I read this book and I'm so so so so glad that she did. Again, a book that's stayed with me since reading it. I absolutely could not put this book down and Atwood explores so many ideas that are resonant today in YA literature.

12. The Hobbit by JRR Tolkien -- I FINALLY read this. There's nothing more I really need to say (except: TO THE LORD OF THE RINGS!)

13. How To Build a Girl by Caitlin Moran -- I saw Moran speak in July and she was fantastic. This lovely novel has put into words something I've been trying to grasp for so long; we rebuild ourselves over and over again, we form ourselves on our idols and reinvent ourselves until we're who we want to be.

14. Seraphina by Rachel Hartman -- This fantasy is absolutely beautiful and MORE PLEASE. Thank you Gabriella for the wonderful recommendation! I so hope that she releases the second one soon.


So there we have it, 14 books I loved in 2014. For more reviews and to see what I'm reading this year, make sure to have a look at my goodreads!

HAPPY NEW YEAR!

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